UNIT 2 THERE IS / THERE ARE SOME, ANY, A, AN

              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOME, ANY, A, AN

                     Sin títuloSin título   

NUMBERS
100   a/one hundred
101   a hundred and one
110   a hundred and ten
120   a hundred and twenty
200   two hundred
1,000   a/one thousand
1,001   a thousand and one
1,010   a thousand and ten
2,000   two thousand
10,000   ten thousand
11,000   eleven thousand
100,000   a/one hundred thousand
1,000,000   a/one million
2,000,000   two million
1,000,000,000   a/one billion

Separation between hundreds and tens

Hundreds and tens are usually separated by ‘and’ (in American English ‘and’ is not necessary).

110 – one hundred and ten
1,250 – one thousand, two hundred and fifty
2,001 – two thousand and one

Hundreds

Use 100 always with ‘a’ or ‘one’.

100 – a hundred / one hundred

‘a’ can only stand at the beginning of a number.

100 – a hundred / one hundred
2,100 – two thousand, one hundred

Thousands and Millions

Use 1,000 and 1,000,000 always with ‘a’ or ‘one’.

1,000 – a thousand / one thousand
201,000 – two hundred and one thousand

Use commas as a separator.

57,458,302

The Number 1,000,000,000

In English this number is a billion. This is very tricky for nations where ‘a billion’ has 12 zeros. 1,000,000,000,000 in English, however, is a trillion.

         

UNIT 1 – ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY

                                       

Adverbs of Frequency

With the present simple, we often use adverbs of frequency to say ‘how often’ we do something. Here’s a list of common adverbs:

  • always
  • frequently
  • generally
  • hardly ever
  • infrequently
  • never
  • normally
  • occasionally
  • often
  • rarely
  • regularly
  • seldom
  • sometimes
  • usually

We usually put these adverbs in the middle of the sentence, between the subject and the verb:

  • I often go to the cinema.
  • She sometimes visits me at home.
  • We usually drink coffee.

We can also put them at the very beginning or end of the sentence. This makes them stronger:

  • Often I go to the cinema.
  • I go to the cinema often.
  • But never: I go often to the cinema.

Here are some other expressions we can use to say ‘how often’. All of these longer phrases go at the beginning or the end of the sentence but not in the middle.

  • once in a while: I go to the cinema once in a while.
  • every now and again: She drinks wine every now and again.
  • from time to time: From time to time I visit my mother.

To say how often something happens, you can use a number or ‘several’ or ‘many’, followed by ‘times’.( If the number is one, use ‘once’ instead of ‘one time’. If the number is two use ‘twice,’ instead of ‘two times’) Then add ‘a’ and a period of time:

  • I go to the cinema twice a week.
  • She takes these tablets three times a day.
  • I change the sheets once a fortnight (fortnight = two weeks).
  • I meet him several times a year.
  • I visit my parents once a month.

We can also use ‘every’ + period of time:

  • every morning
  • every day
  • every Tuesday
  • every week
  • every month

A day of the week with ‘s’ at the end (for example ‘on Tuesdays‘) means the same as ‘every Tuesday’:

  • I take a dance class on Wednesdays.
  • I relax on Saturdays.

WATCH THIS VIDEO ABOUT ADVERBS OF FRECUENCY

Oliver and Alfie are at home when Daisy and Amy arrive. Sophie is in Hammerfest in northern Norway.

INTERACTIVE BOOK – ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY